Edit ModuleShow Tags

Rule-Defying Design

Barclay Butera puts his own spin on spaces that celebrate their surroundings from the California coast to the peaks of Park City



Barclay Butera interior designer
Barclay Butera's style obsession isn't confined to interiors; he often sports tailored suits and designer footwear. Read more about what’s in his closet.  [Portrait courtesy of Lexington Home Brands]

When asked to share his design philosophy, Barclay Butera answers simply. “There are no rules,” he says. This mantra makes sense as a doctrine for the multi-tasking designer, whose ventures span the fields of luxury interiors, textiles, wallpaper, furniture, books, and soon, real estate. And though he’s known for his love of layering patterns, textures and colors, his style is just as fluid as his resumé. 

With roots in Newport Beach and three showrooms in California, Butera’s coastal-chic designs that draw from palettes of sea blues and crisp whites are a given. But more surprising are the projects designed out of his hub in Park City, Utah—a showroom that opened in 2001 after his California clients with mountain-getaway properties came to him for design direction. In these homes, Butera adapts to the surrounding landscape by pairing raw materials and warm, earthy hues with his signature breezy aura. The result is a versatile Mountain Modern approach that’s all his own.

“I like to think I have an all-American appeal,” he says. “My projects across the country really reflect the fabric of America, some with a global twist, but I am proud of that diversity and ability to adapt to different regions of the country and internationally as well.”

Here, a glance at a few of our favorite mountain designs by Butera.


Photos by Ryan Garvin

For a retreat in Deer Crest—a luxury community in Park City, Utah—Butera incorporated antler accessories (above), reclaimed wood and a furry rug (below) to add rustic sensibility to an otherwise contemporary design.

Throughout his mountain-home projects, Butera practices restraint with accessories, fabrics and hues that give a subtle nod to traditional Western design without cladding every surface in timber and animal hides. Metallic touches and warm white walls yield a clean, contemporary vibe. 

SEE ALSO:
Barclay Butera's Favorite Things

SaveSave

Get more content like this:  Subscribe to the magazine | Sign up for our free e-newsletter

 

Edit ModuleShow Tags

Archive »You Might Also Enjoy

Top 15 Mountain Homes of 2018

A countdown of the most popular homes published in 2018

The ML List: Top Architects & Designers 2019

Our guide to the Best in the West

What Happens When a Western Mountain Town Comes of Age?

Communities with a rich traditional history have the opportunity to reinvent themselves with a diverse residential fabric.
Edit Module

Get Mountain Living in your inbox...FREE!

Subscribe to our weekly newsletters, High Points (select magazine plus web exclusive content) and Out & About (high country events and happenings) for more inspiration! Edit ModuleShow Tags

Edit ModuleShow Tags Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleEdit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags Edit ModuleShow Tags
 
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags