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A Western Renaissance Man

Wildlife photographer Jace Romick skied on the US Ski Team before becoming a furniture maker, rodeo contestant, and artist



BATTLE SCARS
Limited edition of 250
Metal print with an acrylic overlay
Handcrafted reclaimed-wood frames with silver edge trim
jaceromickgallery.com

THE ARTIST: Jace Romick

KNOWN FOR: Stunning Western photography of horses and rodeo life, and handmade artisanal frames. 

RANCH-RAISED: “I grew up on a Steamboat Springs ranch. What truly inspires me is the Rocky Mountain lifestyle, the wilderness and landscape—and the wildlife. I’ve always had a connection with horses. I probably sat on horse before I could walk. When you have an incredible horse, it’s almost a babysitter!”

FIRST LOVE: “I was on the ranch in the summer and on the slopes in the winter. I started skiing when I was five, fell in love with it, and knew it was something that I wanted to pursue. I made the US Ski Team when I was 18 and competed in the FIS World Ski Championships and World Cup downhill events, which gave me the opportunity to travel all over the world.”

FROM FURNITURE TO FRAMES: “I retired from the US Ski Team after five years, and then started my own furniture and interior design business. I started dabbling in photography, and it really took off. Having so much experience designing and building furniture, I felt I had an edge crafting custom frames for my photographs, so that it was an entire presentation of sorts, a complete package.”

RODEO CONTESTANT: “I’ve competed in rodeos since I was in my teens, and still do. Once it’s in your blood, it’s hard to change.”

CURIOUS AS A HORSE: “With my ranch background, I have learned to ‘read the animal,’ sensing their disposition. Many times you have to hang around the herd for days to gain their trust. On one particular shoot, I’d been following a herd of wild horses for a day or so, and they were always moving away from me. The next morning I started again, but a storm moved in. Bummed, I decided to lie down and ended up napping. When I awoke, the whole herd was looking at me about 50 yards away. Their curiosity had brought them back, and I was able to get some really great photos.”

AN OPEN LENS: “With Battle Scars, I had been concentrating on a group of younger stallions who were down below those horses. After two hours of snapping photos, I decided to turn and take about five shots of these two older stallions, who were minding their own business. When I got home and looked through the images, I realized that was by far the best photograph. There’s definitely something about it that speaks to people.”

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