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When in Bloom in Bozeman



Audrey Hall

“You can't help but be inspired by the natural world when you're in Montana. The landscape here is so big and so prominent... and you’re able to do things in Bozeman that you can’t do in other parts of Montana,” says landscape designer Linda Iverson of the city’s unique microclimate. “It gets more rain and has wonderful soil.”

In this elegant Bozeman cottage garden, Iverson took advantage of these attributes—along with the client’s elegant vision—and used her go-to native plantings alongside ornamental species not often found in her landscapes. “I love natives and didn’t want the landscape to feel like it was somewhere else,” she explains, “but I also used a lot of ornamentals. We were able to stretch our boundaries.” Here, Iverson shares her top three plants from each category:

NATIVES

[Photo credit: Charles Iscove]

Prairie Smoke (Geum triflorum) 
"One of the first flowers to bloom; soft, wispy seed-heads give this plant a long season of interest. We paired it with the ornamentals salva ‘May Night’ and white creeping phlox." 

 

[Photo credit: Janet Allen]

Prairie Dropseed (Sporobolus heterolepis) 
"This plant is slow to green up in the spring but has a wonderful soft texture for most of the season. Even though it’s a prairie grass, it seems to tolerate rich garden conditions."

 

[Photo credit: Hugh Conlon]

Bush Clematis (Clematis integrifolia) 
"
We planted these velvety blue-violet nodding flowers near the aspens along with columbines and globeflower."

 

ORNAMENTALS

[Photo credit: Joy Shrader]

Siberian Iris ‘Caesars Brother’ (Iris sibirica) 
"Its strong vertical foliage is maintained throughout the season, and we paired it with golden thyme for contrast and good 'footing.'"

 

[Photo credit: Pinterest]

Peony ‘Couronne d’Or’ (Paeonia ‘Couronne d’Or’) 
"It has an exceptional fragrance and billowy white flowers. The perfect cut flower."

 

[Photo credit: gwnursery.com]

Spirea ‘Halward’s Silver’ (Spiraea nipponica) 
"A great shrub for low-light areas of the garden. The fine-textured foliage makes a great backdrop for big-leaf geraniums."

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