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This 15,000-Acre Colorado Ranch Blends Into Its Site

From its buttresses and incredible views to its show-stopping fireplace, this home’s sophisticated style puts the “rock” in Rocky Mountains.



Photos by David Marlowe

From its buttresses and incredible views to its show-stopping fireplace, this sophisticated home near Colorado’s Continental Divide puts the “rock” in Rocky Mountains. The home, which sits on a working elk ranch, is effortlessly sculptural and elegant—allowing the rock formations both in and around the home to do all the talking.

Take a tour below to experience its powerful design.

An iconic paper “harvest moon” by Isamu Noguchi greets visitors upon entry, adding to the dramatic views of the mountain range beyond.

The home is buttressed with huge amounts of rock, including a show-stopping over-12-feet-long stone fireplace that serves as the central axis of the house. Taking its cues from the surrounding landscape, the rocks of the fireplace “tumble” into the room, and the custom bronze windows are mounted into the rocks.

Freeform custom sofas echo the boulders, and their long luxurious “patch-worked” mohair adds a soft, organic texture to the space. The reclaimed tables, which mimic the natural architecture of rock and mineral formations, were crafted from reclaimed wood of a former walnut orchard in California.

An alabaster chandelier hangs above the dining room’s modern steel table and wicker dining chairs.

The kitchen boasts hand-lashed and hand-woven bar stools crafted and interpreted from original wingback chairs from Scotland’s Orkney Islands. Walnut bead-board cabinetry adds warmth and dimension, while industrial pendant lights add a sense of geometric modernism.

The bed and lounge chair in the master suite were crafted with reclaimed cherry tree logs. An antique Native American straw backrest is featured above the bed. The bedding was hand-beaded and the drapery was hand-loomed to echo the homeowners’ growing collection of Navajo textiles and artifacts, and to add even more interest, texture, and warmth to the space.

The home office boasts a mix of high and low materials. The desk was custom made for the owner out of reclaimed spruce. The green suede chair is an English barber’s chair, and the rawhide leather trunk behind it is a 17th century antique. Suede hides draped over matchstick shades adorn the office windows, balancing out the vintage English vibe with some organic, mountain flair.

The home is located in a location that it is impassable during the Colorado winter, which means that the house is meant to be enjoyed during the summer, fall, and late spring—times of the year when the colors and textures of the home’s stunning views best match its interiors. To its owners’ delight, this retreat pays homage to the Rocky Mountain landscape and expresses the owners’ personalities, all without falling into a mountain-home stereotype.

DESIGN DETAILS:

ARCHITECTURE John Knudson INTERIOR DESIGN Mark Boone & Mimi London

Mark Boone is the President and CEO of Mark Boone, Inc. Interiors, where he creates luxurious, organically influenced design, as well as Mimi London, Inc., a furniture design showroom and workshop based in Los Angeles. View the Mimi London profile or contact Mark at 310.855.2567.

Content for this article provided by Mimi London, Inc.

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